Healthecare Providers Risk of Acquiring Bloodbourne Diseases

For a a person who has not had a Hepatitis B vaccines, the risk from a needlestick or cut exposure to Hepatitis B (HBV)-infected blood ranges from 6-30% . Also there is a risk for HBV infection from exposures to the eyes, nose, mouth or non-intact skin, but there is no known risk for HBV infection from exposure to intact skin.

The average risk for infection after a needlestick or cut exposure to Hepatitis C (HCV) infected blood is approximately 1.8%. The risk following a blood exposure to the eye, nose or mouth is unknown, but is believed to be very small. There is also a small risk of HCV transmission from exposure to non-intact skin, but there is no known risk from exposure to intact skin.

The risk of acquiring HIV from a needlestick or cut exposure is is 0.3%. The risk after exposure to the eye, nose, or mouth to HIV-infected blood is estimated to be 0.1% , and the risk after exposure of non-intact skin is estimated to be less than 0.1%.  Small amount of blood on intact are believed not to pose any risk at all.

Although the risks seem low, it is important to follow Universal Precautions when dealing with blood, and this is not just limited to healthcare workers, but nail salons, barber shops, or any occupation where blood may be involved. If your job does involve coming into contact with blood, consider getting your Hepatitis B Vaccine, if you have not already done so, and get tested regularly for Hepatitis C and HIV.

Source:

Centers for Disease Control